Author Topic: Do women really spend 1/4 M more than men on appearance?  (Read 18336 times)

Hirondelle

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Re: Do women really spend 1/4 M more than men on appearance?
« Reply #250 on: June 24, 2018, 08:46:27 AM »
For TV and theatre usually everyone - including males - wears make up for the sake of the light/camera. Without the make-up apparently you'd look weird and your skin reflects the light or sth?

I've never seen the male bra thing. A quick Google search told me some Asians had done it out of protest, but couldn't find anything in relation to being overweight?

Linda_Norway

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Re: Do women really spend 1/4 M more than men on appearance?
« Reply #251 on: June 24, 2018, 01:00:06 PM »
For TV and theatre usually everyone - including males - wears make up for the sake of the light/camera. Without the make-up apparently you'd look weird and your skin reflects the light or sth?

I've never seen the male bra thing. A quick Google search told me some Asians had done it out of protest, but couldn't find anything in relation to being overweight?

About the TV makeup. Yes, everyone is covered with cream/powder against the light reflections. But they are also wearing eye makeup, I think with the goal to make them look more attractive.

Those Asaian men, I saw that on TV many years ago.

GuitarStv

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Re: Do women really spend 1/4 M more than men on appearance?
« Reply #252 on: June 25, 2018, 02:49:30 PM »
For TV and theatre usually everyone - including males - wears make up for the sake of the light/camera. Without the make-up apparently you'd look weird and your skin reflects the light or sth?

I've never seen the male bra thing. A quick Google search told me some Asians had done it out of protest, but couldn't find anything in relation to being overweight?

About the TV makeup. Yes, everyone is covered with cream/powder against the light reflections. But they are also wearing eye makeup, I think with the goal to make them look more attractive.

Those Asaian men, I saw that on TV many years ago.

Who would have guessed that Seinfeld would be so prophetic?  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wfONNfAjyrc

RetiredAt63

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Re: Do women really spend 1/4 M more than men on appearance?
« Reply #253 on: June 25, 2018, 04:11:35 PM »
I can do anything in the right kind of skirt that I can do in pants, as I could as a girl.  And just wear shorts under your skirt, as a girl and you can do anything.

Gin, I think the point is not that you can do anything in a skirt that you can do in pants - I can think of things I can do in a loose knee-length skirt that I can't do in tight pants - like run faster.   The point is that to be equally functional, girls have to take that extra step - like wear the skort, or shorts under their skirt, or snow pants over their tunic.  And sometimes the "right kind of skirt" is not what will be socially acceptable - can you do all those things in a pleatless pencil skirt?  Or a long (1" off the floor) skirt?  I remember midis, and ick the dirt and slush they picked up.

OtherJen

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Re: Do women really spend 1/4 M more than men on appearance?
« Reply #254 on: June 25, 2018, 04:36:59 PM »
I can do anything in the right kind of skirt that I can do in pants, as I could as a girl.  And just wear shorts under your skirt, as a girl and you can do anything.

Gin, I think the point is not that you can do anything in a skirt that you can do in pants - I can think of things I can do in a loose knee-length skirt that I can't do in tight pants - like run faster.   The point is that to be equally functional, girls have to take that extra step - like wear the skort, or shorts under their skirt, or snow pants over their tunic.  And sometimes the "right kind of skirt" is not what will be socially acceptable - can you do all those things in a pleatless pencil skirt?  Or a long (1" off the floor) skirt?  I remember midis, and ick the dirt and slush they picked up.

This. I attended Catholic school through 8th grade. The girls wore skirts, boys wore pants. We were given recess twice per day, and we had access to a playground with many climbing structures. The boys didn't spare a second thought before running and climbing. The girls weren't allowed to do either unless we had worn gym shorts under our skirts.

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Re: Do women really spend 1/4 M more than men on appearance?
« Reply #255 on: June 25, 2018, 04:58:03 PM »
I can do anything in the right kind of skirt that I can do in pants, as I could as a girl.  And just wear shorts under your skirt, as a girl and you can do anything.

Gin, I think the point is not that you can do anything in a skirt that you can do in pants - I can think of things I can do in a loose knee-length skirt that I can't do in tight pants - like run faster.   The point is that to be equally functional, girls have to take that extra step - like wear the skort, or shorts under their skirt, or snow pants over their tunic.  And sometimes the "right kind of skirt" is not what will be socially acceptable - can you do all those things in a pleatless pencil skirt?  Or a long (1" off the floor) skirt?  I remember midis, and ick the dirt and slush they picked up.

This. I attended Catholic school through 8th grade. The girls wore skirts, boys wore pants. We were given recess twice per day, and we had access to a playground with many climbing structures. The boys didn't spare a second thought before running and climbing. The girls weren't allowed to do either unless we had worn gym shorts under our skirts.

Then of course there was the entire trend of skirt pulling in which the object of the game was to expose the girl's shorts, or panties, or legs, or whatever. They'd pull the skirt up, or down, or wherever. Meanwhile, while wearing pants with a belt, they couldn't be attacked the same way. So it was all tee-hee and ha-ha, and if a teacher noticed, he or she would generally find a way to punish the girl.

It's harder to physically humiliate or attack someone who's wearing pants. That makes pants the superior default garment for self defense.

How many martial arts uniforms do you see that feature a skirt?

OtherJen

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Re: Do women really spend 1/4 M more than men on appearance?
« Reply #256 on: June 25, 2018, 07:22:03 PM »
I can do anything in the right kind of skirt that I can do in pants, as I could as a girl.  And just wear shorts under your skirt, as a girl and you can do anything.

Gin, I think the point is not that you can do anything in a skirt that you can do in pants - I can think of things I can do in a loose knee-length skirt that I can't do in tight pants - like run faster.   The point is that to be equally functional, girls have to take that extra step - like wear the skort, or shorts under their skirt, or snow pants over their tunic.  And sometimes the "right kind of skirt" is not what will be socially acceptable - can you do all those things in a pleatless pencil skirt?  Or a long (1" off the floor) skirt?  I remember midis, and ick the dirt and slush they picked up.

This. I attended Catholic school through 8th grade. The girls wore skirts, boys wore pants. We were given recess twice per day, and we had access to a playground with many climbing structures. The boys didn't spare a second thought before running and climbing. The girls weren't allowed to do either unless we had worn gym shorts under our skirts.

Then of course there was the entire trend of skirt pulling in which the object of the game was to expose the girl's shorts, or panties, or legs, or whatever. They'd pull the skirt up, or down, or wherever. Meanwhile, while wearing pants with a belt, they couldn't be attacked the same way. So it was all tee-hee and ha-ha, and if a teacher noticed, he or she would generally find a way to punish the girl.

It's harder to physically humiliate or attack someone who's wearing pants. That makes pants the superior default garment for self defense.

How many martial arts uniforms do you see that feature a skirt?

Oh man, Iím having so many unpleasant 6th grade flashbacks right now. There were a couple of bullies in my class who teamed up to grab unsuspecting girls around the waist and pull up their skirts at recess. The adult monitors did nothing (this actually worked in my favor, as I sunk my nails into the hand of the bully who grabbed me and drew blood in multiple places. The monitor assessed the situation and walked away).

DS

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Re: Do women really spend 1/4 M more than men on appearance?
« Reply #257 on: June 26, 2018, 11:18:33 AM »
A guy at my office was wearing a skirt the other day, when it was super hot.

Where do you live/work? Goals.

penguintroopers

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Re: Do women really spend 1/4 M more than men on appearance?
« Reply #258 on: June 26, 2018, 11:50:40 AM »

Then of course there was the entire trend of skirt pulling in which the object of the game was to expose the girl's shorts, or panties, or legs, or whatever. They'd pull the skirt up, or down, or wherever. Meanwhile, while wearing pants with a belt, they couldn't be attacked the same way. So it was all tee-hee and ha-ha, and if a teacher noticed, he or she would generally find a way to punish the girl.

It's harder to physically humiliate or attack someone who's wearing pants. That makes pants the superior default garment for self defense.

How many martial arts uniforms do you see that feature a skirt?

Oh man, Iím having so many unpleasant 6th grade flashbacks right now. There were a couple of bullies in my class who teamed up to grab unsuspecting girls around the waist and pull up their skirts at recess. The adult monitors did nothing (this actually worked in my favor, as I sunk my nails into the hand of the bully who grabbed me and drew blood in multiple places. The monitor assessed the situation and walked away).

I literally don't understand how this is the girl's fault, and why this wasn't considered a situation of harassment. If I was a parent and found that my daughter had been punished when a boy indecently exposed her at school, the school director and full board would have it from me.

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Re: Do women really spend 1/4 M more than men on appearance?
« Reply #259 on: June 26, 2018, 12:17:50 PM »

Then of course there was the entire trend of skirt pulling in which the object of the game was to expose the girl's shorts, or panties, or legs, or whatever. They'd pull the skirt up, or down, or wherever. Meanwhile, while wearing pants with a belt, they couldn't be attacked the same way. So it was all tee-hee and ha-ha, and if a teacher noticed, he or she would generally find a way to punish the girl.

It's harder to physically humiliate or attack someone who's wearing pants. That makes pants the superior default garment for self defense.

How many martial arts uniforms do you see that feature a skirt?

Oh man, Iím having so many unpleasant 6th grade flashbacks right now. There were a couple of bullies in my class who teamed up to grab unsuspecting girls around the waist and pull up their skirts at recess. The adult monitors did nothing (this actually worked in my favor, as I sunk my nails into the hand of the bully who grabbed me and drew blood in multiple places. The monitor assessed the situation and walked away).

I literally don't understand how this is the girl's fault, and why this wasn't considered a situation of harassment. If I was a parent and found that my daughter had been punished when a boy indecently exposed her at school, the school director and full board would have it from me.

Assuming you found out, and assuming the school officials owned up to having punished her in the first place. Things are marginally better in the modern era but that's just because cell phones and cameras are everywhere so people charged with protecting the public peace have to at least pretend to do their jobs at least some of the time.

There's such a thing as a toxic operating environment that enables one person, or one group of people, to mistreat others and get away with it. The problem is perpetuated not by the aggressive person but by nearly everybody else around him or her, who engage in enabling behaviors that started out as survival strategies. I wrote about it in one of my books (the one on social self defense won't be out for several months).

I'll provide an anecdote that explains how systems and groups of people protect abusers. When my kid brother was in school, one of his teachers was somebody who probably shouldn't have been teaching. Several parents complained about her screaming at the kids, pounding on desks, and threatening to gouge out the children's eyes. Some of the students were traumatized to the point of wetting the bed or requiring psychiatric help. Eventually some of the parents started to believe their children because they were in communication with other parents and the topic of conversation came up. But complain as the parents would, the principal and school board were on the teacher's side or the staff member's side 100% of the time, the school did not permit students to transfer out of their second grade class, and meanwhile the law required the parents to continue to bring their kids to school. The teacher was extremely popular because of the high level of discipline in her class.

Regarding the rule for blaming the person on the receiving end of an attack, the rationale goes like this: most humans don't attack other humans that way, and the ones that do-- the aggressors-- tend to be well known. The interaction model is a fight between two peers of roughly equal power, in which the situation escalates until it sort of explodes. (Other interaction models between people in conflict aren't acknowledged, because according to the pie-in-the-sky mentality of most people in education and academia there's no such thing as conflict between people of radically different power or privilege levels.) So if there's an incident, the target must have done something to contribute to it such as failing to avoid the aggressor sufficiently or somehow instigating. Furthermore, there are separate rules for aggressors or targets. The aggressor belongs to a people for whom the predatory conduct is deemed to be right, normal, and acceptable, or at least harmless because it's "only in fun". It's within the acceptable range of behaviors for the people in the aggressor's category. But the target belongs to a different group that has different rules. It's the target's responsibility to control not just the target's behavior but also the aggressor's. If there's trouble that's serious enough for an authority figure to get involved, then the target must be at least partially to blame.

OtherJen

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Re: Do women really spend 1/4 M more than men on appearance?
« Reply #260 on: June 26, 2018, 03:19:29 PM »

Then of course there was the entire trend of skirt pulling in which the object of the game was to expose the girl's shorts, or panties, or legs, or whatever. They'd pull the skirt up, or down, or wherever. Meanwhile, while wearing pants with a belt, they couldn't be attacked the same way. So it was all tee-hee and ha-ha, and if a teacher noticed, he or she would generally find a way to punish the girl.

It's harder to physically humiliate or attack someone who's wearing pants. That makes pants the superior default garment for self defense.

How many martial arts uniforms do you see that feature a skirt?

Oh man, Iím having so many unpleasant 6th grade flashbacks right now. There were a couple of bullies in my class who teamed up to grab unsuspecting girls around the waist and pull up their skirts at recess. The adult monitors did nothing (this actually worked in my favor, as I sunk my nails into the hand of the bully who grabbed me and drew blood in multiple places. The monitor assessed the situation and walked away).

I literally don't understand how this is the girl's fault, and why this wasn't considered a situation of harassment. If I was a parent and found that my daughter had been punished when a boy indecently exposed her at school, the school director and full board would have it from me.

The main bully was a girl, and I'd had several previous run-ins with her that got absolutely no response from the school office or associated Catholic parish (private school = no board), even though things were bad enough that my parents filed a formal complaint during my 3rd grade year. I don't think I even bothered to tell my parents about the 6th grade incident because I had no reason to expect that 1) the school would do a damned thing or 2) my parents would let me leave and go to the very good public schools in our city. This particular bully didn't return for 7th grade, so I suspect that enough other victims and their parents complained that the school finally had to step up.

Kitsunegari

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Re: Do women really spend 1/4 M more than men on appearance?
« Reply #261 on: June 27, 2018, 07:58:19 AM »
A bit late to the party, my opinions have already been worded by other people, but I chime in to testify that I literally lost a job over my refusal to have stylish hair and wear make up. I literally lost my income because of it. So yeah, personal choice and all that jazz, but it is NOT consequence-free.

Receptionist in a 4* hotel, if you must know.

pachnik

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Re: Do women really spend 1/4 M more than men on appearance?
« Reply #262 on: June 27, 2018, 08:28:29 AM »
A bit late to the party, my opinions have already been worded by other people, but I chime in to testify that I literally lost a job over my refusal to have stylish hair and wear make up. I literally lost my income because of it. So yeah, personal choice and all that jazz, but it is NOT consequence-free.

Receptionist in a 4* hotel, if you must know.

Yes, this is a concern of mine too.  Can't wear most make-up because I have lots of skin allergies.  No lip colour or else the skin on my lips weeps. 

Zikoris

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Re: Do women really spend 1/4 M more than men on appearance?
« Reply #263 on: June 27, 2018, 09:36:54 AM »
I don't think that's the norm for receptionists, for what it's worth. I've been a receptionist for quite a few years at a number of different places, including one very high end law firm, and nobody ever cared about my lack of makeup or fancy hair.

Kitsunegari

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Re: Do women really spend 1/4 M more than men on appearance?
« Reply #264 on: June 27, 2018, 09:54:42 AM »
I don't think that's the norm for receptionists, for what it's worth. I've been a receptionist for quite a few years at a number of different places, including one very high end law firm, and nobody ever cared about my lack of makeup or fancy hair.

That specific hotel was a very unhealthy work environment, and I was glad someone had made for me the decision to get another job, but none of this was my landlord's problem, and for a less lucky woman it could have been a serious setback.

PoutineLover

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Re: Do women really spend 1/4 M more than men on appearance?
« Reply #265 on: June 27, 2018, 11:24:59 AM »
A guy at my office was wearing a skirt the other day, when it was super hot.

Where do you live/work? Goals.
At a university, he's a computer guy in my department. We have a pretty relaxed dress code.

GuitarStv

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Re: Do women really spend 1/4 M more than men on appearance?
« Reply #266 on: June 29, 2018, 06:23:06 PM »
I can do anything in the right kind of skirt that I can do in pants, as I could as a girl.  And just wear shorts under your skirt, as a girl and you can do anything.

Gin, I think the point is not that you can do anything in a skirt that you can do in pants - I can think of things I can do in a loose knee-length skirt that I can't do in tight pants - like run faster.   The point is that to be equally functional, girls have to take that extra step - like wear the skort, or shorts under their skirt, or snow pants over their tunic.  And sometimes the "right kind of skirt" is not what will be socially acceptable - can you do all those things in a pleatless pencil skirt?  Or a long (1" off the floor) skirt?  I remember midis, and ick the dirt and slush they picked up.

This. I attended Catholic school through 8th grade. The girls wore skirts, boys wore pants. We were given recess twice per day, and we had access to a playground with many climbing structures. The boys didn't spare a second thought before running and climbing. The girls weren't allowed to do either unless we had worn gym shorts under our skirts.

Then of course there was the entire trend of skirt pulling in which the object of the game was to expose the girl's shorts, or panties, or legs, or whatever. They'd pull the skirt up, or down, or wherever. Meanwhile, while wearing pants with a belt, they couldn't be attacked the same way. So it was all tee-hee and ha-ha, and if a teacher noticed, he or she would generally find a way to punish the girl.

It's harder to physically humiliate or attack someone who's wearing pants. That makes pants the superior default garment for self defense.

How many martial arts uniforms do you see that feature a skirt?

A hakama is pretty skirt like (still technically pants I guess though).  Typically worn in traditional Japanese martial arts (kendo, iaido, aikido), it's great for concealing foot and leg position.

Putting belt loops on a skirt and wearing a belt would prevent most of the attacks you're describing here.

OtherJen

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Re: Do women really spend 1/4 M more than men on appearance?
« Reply #267 on: June 29, 2018, 06:31:39 PM »
I can do anything in the right kind of skirt that I can do in pants, as I could as a girl.  And just wear shorts under your skirt, as a girl and you can do anything.

Gin, I think the point is not that you can do anything in a skirt that you can do in pants - I can think of things I can do in a loose knee-length skirt that I can't do in tight pants - like run faster.   The point is that to be equally functional, girls have to take that extra step - like wear the skort, or shorts under their skirt, or snow pants over their tunic.  And sometimes the "right kind of skirt" is not what will be socially acceptable - can you do all those things in a pleatless pencil skirt?  Or a long (1" off the floor) skirt?  I remember midis, and ick the dirt and slush they picked up.

This. I attended Catholic school through 8th grade. The girls wore skirts, boys wore pants. We were given recess twice per day, and we had access to a playground with many climbing structures. The boys didn't spare a second thought before running and climbing. The girls weren't allowed to do either unless we had worn gym shorts under our skirts.

Then of course there was the entire trend of skirt pulling in which the object of the game was to expose the girl's shorts, or panties, or legs, or whatever. They'd pull the skirt up, or down, or wherever. Meanwhile, while wearing pants with a belt, they couldn't be attacked the same way. So it was all tee-hee and ha-ha, and if a teacher noticed, he or she would generally find a way to punish the girl.

It's harder to physically humiliate or attack someone who's wearing pants. That makes pants the superior default garment for self defense.

How many martial arts uniforms do you see that feature a skirt?

A hakama is pretty skirt like (still technically pants I guess though).  Typically worn in traditional Japanese martial arts (kendo, iaido, aikido), it's great for concealing foot and leg position.

Putting belt loops on a skirt and wearing a belt would prevent most of the attacks you're describing here.

I think you missed the point. The skirts were being lifted up by the hem, not pulled down over the hips.

RetiredAt63

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Re: Do women really spend 1/4 M more than men on appearance?
« Reply #268 on: June 30, 2018, 10:28:05 AM »
Putting belt loops on a skirt and wearing a belt would prevent most of the attacks you're describing here.

I think you missed the point. The skirts were being lifted up by the hem, not pulled down over the hips.

Well, we now know GuitarStv wasn't a jerk in elementary school, he doesn't know the technique.   ;-)

GuitarStv

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Re: Do women really spend 1/4 M more than men on appearance?
« Reply #269 on: June 30, 2018, 05:29:18 PM »
Putting belt loops on a skirt and wearing a belt would prevent most of the attacks you're describing here.

I think you missed the point. The skirts were being lifted up by the hem, not pulled down over the hips.

Well, we now know GuitarStv wasn't a jerk in elementary school, he doesn't know the technique.   ;-)

Iíve written and deleted so many responses to this series of posts...

Instead, Iím just going to go sew some belt loops into all of my skirts to keep myself safe from my skirt ever being pulled down. Seems like the rational thing to do...

I had my pants pulled down by another (male) kid in front of the whole class in grade four, and everyone but me (teacher included) had a good laugh about it.  I've been wearing a belt with my pants every day since then.  It seemed like the rational thing to do at the time, although obviously not the ideal (or really, any) solution to the problem.

OtherJen

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Re: Do women really spend 1/4 M more than men on appearance?
« Reply #270 on: June 30, 2018, 06:01:45 PM »
Putting belt loops on a skirt and wearing a belt would prevent most of the attacks you're describing here.

I think you missed the point. The skirts were being lifted up by the hem, not pulled down over the hips.

Well, we now know GuitarStv wasn't a jerk in elementary school, he doesn't know the technique.   ;-)

Iíve written and deleted so many responses to this series of posts...

Instead, Iím just going to go sew some belt loops into all of my skirts to keep myself safe from my skirt ever being pulled down. Seems like the rational thing to do...

I had my pants pulled down by another (male) kid in front of the whole class in grade four, and everyone but me (teacher included) had a good laugh about it.  I've been wearing a belt with my pants every day since then.  It seemed like the rational thing to do at the time, although obviously not the ideal (or really, any) solution to the problem.

Your teacher sounds like a total fucking asshole

Seconded.

mm1970

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Re: Do women really spend 1/4 M more than men on appearance?
« Reply #271 on: June 30, 2018, 06:13:31 PM »
So, uh, not a girl and also someone without much fashion sense . . . but couldn't you just switch to wearing skirts instead of pants?  If the skirt has pleats, or is wider at the bottom than the top, then you really would only have to mess around with a single waist measurement.  I'd think it would be massively easier all around.
I hate skirts.  For many many reasons.  I only own one.

mm1970

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Re: Do women really spend 1/4 M more than men on appearance?
« Reply #272 on: June 30, 2018, 06:15:59 PM »
The other thing is women generally wear clothes that hug their body.  I'm sure this is more strenuous than loose fitting clothes that I wear.  I've never had to squeeze into a pair of jeans for example.

(And if anyone wants to come back with a snarky statement like "Well you should just lose weight then," let me invite you to please go fuck yourself. There is no proven protocol for losing weight and fat people also need to be clothed.)

I agree with you that everyone should be able to find clothes that fit on their body, but come on with this fat-logic.  Losing weight isn't easy, but it is simple - take in less energy than you expend.  It doesn't necessarily make things less expensive though - it's easier to want to spend more once you start looking good in clothes. 
Yes, just eat less energy than you expend.  The problem is the how you do that.  The low carb diets are really efficient at weight loss, but carbs also affect your mood:
https://www.webmd.com/food-recipes/features/how-food-affects-your-moods#1

Some people are more susceptible than others.  Personally, the easiest way for me to lose weight is for me to out exercise my food intake, but to generally keep the carbs, proteins, and fats, just relatively healthy versions, and maybe slightly increase them.  Of course that only works if I'm healthy enough for exercise.
You can't out-exercise a bad diet.

or, in other words...that stops working at some point for everyone.  For some?  They can keep it up until age 60.  For me, it was 25, on the nose.

GuitarStv

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Re: Do women really spend 1/4 M more than men on appearance?
« Reply #273 on: June 30, 2018, 06:37:50 PM »
Putting belt loops on a skirt and wearing a belt would prevent most of the attacks you're describing here.

I think you missed the point. The skirts were being lifted up by the hem, not pulled down over the hips.

Well, we now know GuitarStv wasn't a jerk in elementary school, he doesn't know the technique.   ;-)

Iíve written and deleted so many responses to this series of posts...

Instead, Iím just going to go sew some belt loops into all of my skirts to keep myself safe from my skirt ever being pulled down. Seems like the rational thing to do...

I had my pants pulled down by another (male) kid in front of the whole class in grade four, and everyone but me (teacher included) had a good laugh about it.  I've been wearing a belt with my pants every day since then.  It seemed like the rational thing to do at the time, although obviously not the ideal (or really, any) solution to the problem.

Your teacher sounds like a total fucking asshole

Seconded.

If it makes you feel better, a couple weeks later I threw my chair at that teacher (and was consequently suspended from school for a day).  It happened because the teacher was laughing at me when the chair was yanked out from under me by a classmate while I was sitting down and I fell on my ass in front of everyone.  This was both the most trouble I ever got into in school in my life, and totally worth it. 

:P

OtherJen

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Re: Do women really spend 1/4 M more than men on appearance?
« Reply #274 on: June 30, 2018, 07:58:28 PM »
Putting belt loops on a skirt and wearing a belt would prevent most of the attacks you're describing here.

I think you missed the point. The skirts were being lifted up by the hem, not pulled down over the hips.

Well, we now know GuitarStv wasn't a jerk in elementary school, he doesn't know the technique.   ;-)

Iíve written and deleted so many responses to this series of posts...

Instead, Iím just going to go sew some belt loops into all of my skirts to keep myself safe from my skirt ever being pulled down. Seems like the rational thing to do...

I had my pants pulled down by another (male) kid in front of the whole class in grade four, and everyone but me (teacher included) had a good laugh about it.  I've been wearing a belt with my pants every day since then.  It seemed like the rational thing to do at the time, although obviously not the ideal (or really, any) solution to the problem.

Your teacher sounds like a total fucking asshole

Seconded.

If it makes you feel better, a couple weeks later I threw my chair at that teacher (and was consequently suspended from school for a day).  It happened because the teacher was laughing at me when the chair was yanked out from under me by a classmate while I was sitting down and I fell on my ass in front of everyone.  This was both the most trouble I ever got into in school in my life, and totally worth it. 

:P

Oddly, yes, it does make me feel better. Teacher apparently needed to learn that actions have consequences.

Hula Hoop

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Re: Do women really spend 1/4 M more than men on appearance?
« Reply #275 on: July 01, 2018, 01:43:22 PM »
Putting belt loops on a skirt and wearing a belt would prevent most of the attacks you're describing here.

I think you missed the point. The skirts were being lifted up by the hem, not pulled down over the hips.

Well, we now know GuitarStv wasn't a jerk in elementary school, he doesn't know the technique.   ;-)

Iíve written and deleted so many responses to this series of posts...

Instead, Iím just going to go sew some belt loops into all of my skirts to keep myself safe from my skirt ever being pulled down. Seems like the rational thing to do...

I had my pants pulled down by another (male) kid in front of the whole class in grade four, and everyone but me (teacher included) had a good laugh about it.  I've been wearing a belt with my pants every day since then.  It seemed like the rational thing to do at the time, although obviously not the ideal (or really, any) solution to the problem.

Your teacher sounds like a total fucking asshole

That happened to a kid in my daughter's 4th grade class recently.  The teacher was horrified though and put the culprit in detention.